Vector Clip Art

Clipart:

Most clipart files are vector images saved in an EPS (Illustrator 10) format. If you need the image saved in an older eps version or experience problems with your download don't hesitate to contact us. The illustrations originated from my ephemera collection and other resources and were digitized with Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator. The images are not pixel perfect but appear clean and sharp at any size. Some individual clipart images include multiple variations of the image. (Your download will include all files in a zip archive)

All available products are also listed on our Pinterest and Flickr site.

Copyright:

Unless otherwise noted We make no warranties or guarantees regarding copyright or ownership of individual graphics. All images are provided to you without warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied. Most of the images originated in vintage brochures and other publications and may be in the public domain. However we make no guarantees and images must be used at your own risk. We've included artist signatures whenever possible. Click here for more information related to "ownership" and the public domain on Wikipedia. 

About Vector or EPS images:

There are two basic types of electronic image files: vector graphics and raster (pixel-based) graphics: Vector graphics are created from points, lines, shapes and curves that are based on mathematical formulas. These elements are filled with color, blends, tints or gradients, and lines have a stroke attribute such as a solid or dashed line with different thicknesses and colors. EPS is a file extension for a graphics file format used in vector-based images. EPS stands for "Encapsulated PostScript."

The benefit of vector art is that it is resolution independent—meaning it can be scaled to any size, from a large billboard to a business card, with no loss of detail or sharpness.

The challenge when using a bitmap image file is that each time a bitmap image is manipulated, information is lost, changed and recalculated by the computer as it redraws the altered image. This can result in blurriness, jagged edges and loss of detail. If we tried to double the size of a raster image such as a JPG, the result would be blurry and low quality. But since a vector image is based on mathematical formulas, it can be doubled—or tripled—in size and still retain crisp, high-quality details. Vector images can also be edited to change color or shapes of a section without affecting the whole image.

Most actual brochures are accompanied by a DVD with high resolution scans of every page. You can also purchase DVD's without actual item. Just select "Purchase DVD only" from the selection box on product pages.

Visit visiondesign.com to learn more about vector graphics from Matt Marrinan.

Inkscape is a FREE "Open Source" vector graphics editor with capabilities similar to Illustrator. The program is available for both Apple and Windows users. Click here to learn more.